Told by an idiot



Reblogged from shippyfairy

shippyfairy:

this motherfucking brOTP

Reblogged from pocketaimee

mc-squidward:

pocketaimee:

Hell-aciously busy with work, but I really wanted to draw this comic.

this should have more notes

(via sluttymama)

Reblogged from seriouslyamerica

seriouslyamerica:

BOOK GIVEAWAY!

In the spirit of holiday giving (and the fact that my bookcase no longer accommodates all my books), I’m doing a book giveaway. The books are listed below, with a link to Wikipedia/Amazon/Goodreads for summaries. Some of them are novels, some are memoirs, essays, or theory - some were assigned to me in school, some were recommended to me by fellow Tumblr bloggers, many have my notes and highlighter marks (sorry!), and ALL taught me something.

The Wages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class, by David R. Roediger

The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, by James Weldon Johnson

Jews Without Money, by Michael Gold

Racial Fault Lines: The Historical Origins of White Supremacy in California, by Tomás Almaguer

Down These Mean Streets, by Piri Thomas

The Street: A Novel, by Ann Petry

The FBI, COINTELPRO, And Martin Luther King, Jr.: Final Report Of The Select Committee To Study Governmental Operations With Respect To Intelligence Activities

Blood Done Sign My Name, by Timothy B. Tyson

Soul On Ice, by Eldridge Cleaver

RULES:

  • You do not have to be following me to enter
  • I will count up to two entries, one like, and one reblog (so please don’t spam your followers - there’s no point!)
  • The giveaway will be open until January 12, 2014 (one month to enter)
  • I will choose a winner by random number generator - you MUST HAVE YOUR ASK OPEN, and be comfortable giving me your address so I can ship them
  • If the winner doesn’t respond in 24 hours, I will choose another winner, and so on until someone responds
  • Due to the weight of the books, I can only afford to ship within the continental US (sorry!)

As a final note - many of the books contain graphic material related to racist violence, sexual violence, and homophobic violence, and could be triggering to read.

If you have any questions about the books or the giveaway rules, my ask is open!

(via seriouslyamerica)

Reblogged from anarcho-queer
occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops
Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.
What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.
This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food. 
Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.
Read More

occupyallstreets:

Whistleblowing Wednesday: Children As Young As Six Harvest 25 Percent of U.S. Crops

Knowing the farmer who grows your food has become an important tenet of the modern food movement, but precious little attention is paid to the people who actually pick the crops or “process” the chickens or fillet the fish. U Roberto Romano’s poignant film, The Harvest/La Cosecha (2011), being screened across the country for Farmworker Awareness Week (March 24-29), informs us that nearly 500,000 children as young as six harvest up to 25 percent of all crops in the United States.

What’s illegal in most countries is permitted here. Child migrant labor has been documented in the 48 contiguous states. Seasonal work originates in the southernmost states in late winter where it is warm and migrates north as the weather changes. Every few weeks as families move, children leave school and friends behind. If you’ve had onions (Texas), cucumbers (Ohio or Michigan), peppers (Tennessee), grapes (California), mushrooms (Pennsylvania), beets (Minnesota), or cherries (Washington), you’ve probably eaten food harvested by children.

This isn’t a slavery issue, or an immigration issue per se. What’s remarkable is that most of the migrant child farmworkers are American citizens trying to help their families. This is a poverty issue and it gets to the heart of what we, as consumers, see as the “right price” to pay for food.

Children earn about $1,000 per year for working an average of 30 hours a week, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. When you consider that the average annual pay for a migrant family of four is $12,500-$14,500, it’s apparent why some families feel they have no choice but to bring their children into the fields with them. Half of these kids will not graduate from high school because they’re always moving around, perpetuating the cycle of poverty that caused them to be day laborers in the first place.

Read More

(Source: anarcho-queer, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Reblogged from quotesilyke
People say I love you all the time - when they say, ‘take an umbrella, it’s raining,’ or ‘hurry back,’ or even ‘watch out, you’ll break your neck.’ There are hundreds of ways of wording it - you just have to listen for it, my dear. The Curious Savage (John Patrick)

(Source: quotesilyke, via gigglingbean)

Reblogged from fuzzyhorns

 Mass producing your fake revolution

 Mass producing your fake revolution

(Source: fuzzyhorns, via pantsareunwelcome)

Reblogged from afrikan-mapambano
afrikan-mapambano:

Today in history: December 14, 2008  President George W. Bush goes to Iraq and is almost struck by two shoes thrown at him by Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi during a news conference in Baghdad Al-Zaidi is then dragged out of the room and tortured while in the custody of the Iraqi Police and the U.S. Secret Service His shoe throwing became a potent symbol of Iraqi opposition and resistance to the U.S. occupation of Iraq

afrikan-mapambano:

Today in history: December 14, 2008  President George W. Bush goes to Iraq and is almost struck by two shoes thrown at him by Iraqi journalist Muntadhar al-Zaidi during a news conference in Baghdad Al-Zaidi is then dragged out of the room and tortured while in the custody of the Iraqi Police and the U.S. Secret Service His shoe throwing became a potent symbol of Iraqi opposition and resistance to the U.S. occupation of Iraq

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

Reblogged from underratxd

underratxd:

Relationship Status: Nah

(via mushakemi)

Reblogged from imaginebaggins

imaginebaggins:

HOW TO HANDLE ANNOYING RELATIVES (x)

(via sarcasmismyweapon)

Reblogged from racismschool
A cynical young person is almost the saddest sight to see, because it means that he or she has gone from knowing nothing to believing in nothing. Maya Angelou (via racismschool)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)